This website doesn't work on mobile.
Please view on your desktop or tablet.

The Decade Of

1960s

Decade Introduction

1960 - 1969

The Eurovision Song Contest grew more glamorous and exciting in the 1960s as more countries became involved and European superstars, including Cliff Richard, Françoise Hardy and Nana Mouskouri, took to the stage.

Early editions of the contest had been held on various weekdays, but from 1963, one Saturday every year became the day when families sit down to cheer for their own country, watch and finally see which song is voted to win the Grand Prix.

The presenter who holds the record for presenting the most finals is Katie Boyle for the United Kingdom who undertook the task in 1960, 1963, 1968 and 1974.

1960

Host City

London

The capital of the United Kingdom, London, provided the settings for the fifth Eurovision Song Contest.

This was despite the fact that the Netherlands actually won the Eurovision Song Contest in Cannes the year before with Een Beetje, performed by Teddy Scholten. However, the Dutch broadcaster didn't want to host the contest again.

More

scoreboard

1960 results

France

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

France celebrated its second victory in the short history of the song contest. The winning song Tom Pillibi, performed by Jacqueline Boyer, became a hit in all of Europe in 1960.

More

1961

Host City

Cannes

The Eurovision Song Contest 1961 returned to the beautiful city of Cannes for the second time in its short life.

The number of participants is rising, and the magnitude of the competition increases. Just like in 1959, the Palais des Festivals was the venue of this year's contest. The presenter of the show was Jacqueline Joubert, who already did this task in 1959. The stage used for the show was much bigger than in previous years, and it was magnificently decorated with flowers. For the first time, the contest took place on a Saturday night which would be its regular home for the decades to come.

More

scoreboard

1961 results

Luxembourg

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

Luxembourg had its first of 5 victories in 1961 with the song Nous Les Amoureux performed by Jean-Claude Pascal.

Critics called the song a lullaby, but Jean-Claude Pascal was awarded 31 points in total, with the UK entry by The Allisons comfortably behind with 24 points.

More

1962

Host City

Luxembourg

After the victory in Cannes in 1961, Luxembourg was the host of the seventh Eurovision Song Contest.

The stage was decorated with twinkling stars, but unfortunately they could not be seen for parts of the evening because there were some problems with the lights in the big auditorium of the Villa Louvigny.

More

scoreboard

1962 results

France

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

France managed to win the Eurovision Song Contest for the third time with a dramatic performance by Isabelle Aubret.

She went to win the contest by a landslide: Aubret collected 26 points altogether, outclassing Monaco's entry Dis Rien by 13 points!

More

1963

Host City

London

The honour of hosting this year's song contest was handed over by the French to the United Kingdom.

The main reason was that France did not want to host the song contest so soon after hosting it twice in Cannes in 1959 and 1961. Host Broadcaster BBC tried a different approach for the presentation of the Eurovision Song Contest. All songs were performed in one studio, but the audience was located in another. Each song had its own unique staging, and the change of set was done very quickly. Because of that, rumours arose that the performances were pre-recorded which later turned out to be untrue.

More

scoreboard

1963 results

Denmark

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

Norway's jury was not ready with its voting when called in by the presenter Katie Boyle.

The Norwegian head of jury was still busy adding up the individual votes of the 20 jury members. Struck by panic, the Norwegian jury secretary gave an intermediate result, reading the points very quickly and in the wrong order.

Mrs. Boyle told the audience that she would come back to the Norwegian jury after all other countries had voted. When the final result came in from the Norwegian jury, they were decidedly different from the intermediate ones and gave the victory to Denmark in a close race with Switzerland. It was one of the very first controversial winners of the contest in its long history.

More

1964

Host City

Copenhagen

The 1964 Eurovision Song Contest took place in the famous Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen.

This year, the event was highly political and there were demands that the right-wing dictatorships in Spain and Portugal should be excluded from the contest. There was even some trouble during the contest as just before the Belgian entry, a man entered the stage holding a banner saying "Boycott Franco and Salazar". He was quickly removed from the stage though.

More

scoreboard

1964 results

Italy

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

Italy celebrated its first victory with the song Non Ho l’Età, performed by 16-year-old Gigliola Cinquetti.

Gigliola would also take part in 1974 and would become the host of Eurovision Song Contest of 1991, together with Toto Cutugno.

More

1965

Host City

Naples

Italy and its national broadcaster RAI hosted this year's contest for the first time.

The number of participants was the highest ever as 18 countries took part. After a year of absence, Sweden returned to the competition and Ireland debuted.

Swedish participant Ingvar Wixell performed his song - originally called Annorstädes Vals - in English instead of Swedish while all the other participants sang in their native languages. This incident led to a rule demanding all participants should perform their songs in their respective national languages.

More

scoreboard

1965 results

Luxembourg

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

Belgium, Germany, Finland and Spain all scored 0 points.

Luxembourg won for the second time with the highly controversial Poupée De Cire, Poupée De Son sung by teenager France Gall which later went on to be a massive hit in almost all European countries.

More

1966

Host City

Luxembourg

The capital city of Luxembourg was the home of the 11th Eurovision Song Contest.

The rules for the contest were heavily discussed and many changes were suggested but they remained almost unchanged from the previous year apart from the fact that the national juries could include music experts again.

During the dress rehearsal, the Italian participant Domenico Modugno was not satisfied with the orchestra and left the stage in anger. It was uncertain if he was going to perform during the live show, but he sang Dio Come Ti Amo after all. The song later became a huge success in South America for Gigliola Cinquetti, the winner of 1964.

More

scoreboard

1966 results

Austria

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

The Austrian participant Udo Jürgens participated in the Eurovision Song Contest for the third consecutive time.

He managed to give the first ever victory to his native country with his song Merci Cherie. Udo later became one of the most-loved artists in the German-speaking countries.

More

1967

Host City

Vienna

The contest had a very glamorous setting: the stage included three revolving mirrors and a staircase entrance in the middle.

The juries had undergone a change as well, as half of the jurors had to be less than 30 years old.

During the voting the presenter of the show, Erika Vaal, got confused - she managed to declare the United Kingdom winner of the song contest before the last jury's votes were cast. However, the confusion about the voting would not make any difference: the United Kingdom clearly won for the first time after the country had finished second five times in nine years.

More

scoreboard

1967 results

United Kingdom

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

The winning song Puppet On A String won with one of the largest margins ever witnessed in the history of the Eurovision Song Contest.

Sandie Shaw got 47 points in total, which made her victory one of the biggest so far. In 1964 also a third of all total points given were scored by one country. The song gathered more than twice as many votes as the runner-up, Ireland. But it wasn’t just the juries who were charmed by Sandie Shaw's song, it became a huge success all over Europe and is nowadays remembered as one of the big successes that arose from the Eurovision Song Contest.

More

1968

Host City

London

The 13th Eurovision Song Contest which took place in the Royal Albert Hall was the first contest to be broadcast in colour.

France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom broadcast the 1968 contest in colour despite the fact that very few TV-viewers at home owned a colour TV set. However, colour was here to stay and all song contests since then have been broadcast primarily in colour.

More

scoreboard

1968 results

Spain

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

The 1968 Eurovision Song Contest turned out to have a nail-biting finish when the UK entry and big favourite Congratulations by Cliff Richard was beaten by just one point by Spain's Massiel.

Originally Massiel's song La La La was supposed to be sung by Spanish singer Joan Manuel Serrat who wanted to perfom the song in Catalan. However, Juan Manuel Serrat's wish of singing in his native tongue was not met by the Spanish officials, and Juan Manuel was replaced by Massiel who sang the same song in Spanish.

More

1969

Host City

Madrid

Madrid hosted the 1969 Eurovision Song Contest after Massiel won the trophy in London the year before.

For the first time in the history of the Eurovision Song Contest, the outcome of the voting resulted in a tie for the first place. Four countries gained 18 points each: France, the Netherlands, Spain and the United Kingdom. Since there was no solution for this situation, all four countries were declared winners. Luckily, there were four medals available to the four winning singers - the four medals were intended for the winning singer and three winning songwriters.

More

scoreboard

1969 results

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

One of the most controversial wins in the history of the contest took place in 1969 when four songs tied for first place.

A lot of criticism followed and four countries withdrew from the next contest, the number went down to only 12 in 1970, until a new voting system was adopted for the 1971 edition.

The four winners differed a lot from one another - France had a haunting ballad performed by Frida Boccara, the Netherlands sent in Lenny Kuhr with a guitar, Spain and Salomé performed the energetic Vivo Cantando whereas the star from the British Isles, Lulu, had a happy, clap-along song.

More

Next Decade

1970s

Eurovision

Credits

Project & Content Manager

Marieke Duijts

Editorial contributions

Victor Escudero
Olena Omelyanchuk
Gordon Roxburgh
Jarmo Siim

Concept

Scrn

Technical supervision

Wouter van Vliet

Digital Production

Elespacio - Lucas Onofre

Art Direction & Design

Elespacio - Brijan Powell
Elespacio - Samuel Hoh
Elespacio - Pavel Proshin

Development

Elespacio - Jacek Zakowicz
Elespacio - Cristina Franco
Elespacio - Jonathan Icicson

Photo & video credits

Getty Images
Beeld & Geluid (Dutch Institute for Sound and Vision)
BBC Photo Library
ORF/Thomas Ramstorfer
EBU
Stijn Smulders
Jan Demulder
Wim Dehandschutter
Femke de Laat
Andres Putting
Thomas Hanses
Dennis Stachel
Sander Hesterman
Elke Roels
Marieke Duijts
Indrek Galetin
Alain Douit
Kenneth Thorén (SVT)
SurFeRGiRL30
James Morley
Anthony Kelly
Sam Shaw
Peter Mackey
Philippe Schlesser
Polfoto - Jacob Maarbjerg
Jacinta lluch Valero
Gage Skidmore
Gustavo Devito
Robert Scoble
R Barraez D´Lucca
Asim Bijarani
Chris - RMS Olympic Broadside View Post-Titanic
Kamil Porembiński - RBMK-1000, Chernobyl
Dan Queiroz
François Péladeau / Vancityhotshots
NASA image acquired April 16, 2010
Julian Burgess
Alex Hill
Bryan Dorrough
South African Tourism
Maxwell Hamilton
Paisley Scotland
Alf Melin
Ross Fowler
Cliff
Yukiko Matsuoka
Irish Typepad
hobvias sudoneighm

Special thanks to

Samuel Andersson (SVT)
Stephanie Caflisch (EBU)
Jeroen Depraetere
Maartje Jansma (Beeld & Geluid)
Gijs Kimenai (Beeld & Geluid)
Maiken Maimets (OGAE)
Helen Ridell (BBC)
Sarah Sadek (EBU)
Jon Ola Sand (EBU)
Dave Goodman (EBU)
David A Allan

A special thanks to all Heads of Delegations, members of the Reference Group, EBU Member Broadcaster representatives and fans who have contributed to this project.

Project Supervisor

Sietse Bakker


The EBU and its service providers have made a substantial effort to seek and acquire permission from all relevant rights holders, but has not succeeded to identify the rights holder of certain content elements. In case you identify yourself as rights holder, please contact us at [email protected]

Copyright European Broadcasting Union 2015. All rights reserved. Access to and use of this website is provided by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), an association duly established under Swiss law, located at L'Ancienne-Route 17A, 1218 Grand-Saconnex (Geneva) Switzerland (the "EBU") subject to the following terms:
http://www.eurovision.tv/page/terms-of-use

With thanks

Eurovision Song Contest, Scrn, Elespacio