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The Decade Of

1970s

Decade Introduction

1970 - 1979

The 1970s started with a major drop in the participants list -only 12 delegations decided to take part in 1970 due to the "voting scandal" from the previous year which led to four winners. A new rule was devised; if two or more songs gained the same number of points, each song had to be performed once more and all the other juries had to select their favourite song. If entries still were to tie, both of them would share the first position.

More and more countries all over the world decided to broadcast the Eurovision Song Contest, including Brazil, Chile, Japan, Taiwan, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Dubai and Thailand.

1970

Host City

Amsterdam

Where to go? There were plenty of host countries to choose from following the four-winner tie.

The Netherlands, the United Kingdom, France and Spain - in the preceding year. The host country was decided by a toss of a coin between the Dutch and French broadcasters.

For the second year in a row, the number of participants went down. Finland, Norway, Sweden and Portugal were very dissatisfied about result of the 1969 contest when 4 countries were declared as winners and withdrew from the contest.

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scoreboard

1970 results

Ireland

Stories worth telling

About the winner

Ireland had its first - of many - victories in the history of the Song Contest with Dana's All Kinds Of Everything.

The teenager from Derry went on to score a major international hit with her Euro-song. Dana went on to become a big name in Irish politics in the decades to come. She even ran for the president of Ireland, unsuccessfully, though.

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1971

Host City

Dublin

For the first time in the history of the contest, Ireland hosted the event at the Gaiety Theatre in Dublin.

Compared to 1970, the number of participants rose again to 18 as Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Portugal all re-entered after a year of absence. Malta had its debut, so altogether 18 countries were present and the contest was broadcast in 29 countries.

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scoreboard

1971 results

Monaco

Stories worth telling

Monaco Wins

The small principality of Monaco won for the first time with the song Un Banc, Un Abre, Une Rue by French-born Séverine, who went on to have a successful career in Germany.

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1972

Host City

Edinburgh

Despite the victory of Monaco the previous year, the 1972 Eurovision Song Contest took place in Edinburgh.

The reason that the contest did not take place in Monaco was because the small Mediterranean nation could not provide a decent venue. However, it was later rumoured that the real reason was that Monaco was not in a financial position to host the contest. The BBC took over and chose a venue outside of London for the first time. The honour of hosting the Eurovision Song Contest went to the Scottish capital Edinburgh.

The contest resulted in two big hits all over the continent: Après Toi by winner Vicky Leandros and Beg, Steal Or Borrow by The New Seekers who ended up in the second place.

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scoreboard

1972 results

Luxembourg

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

Luxembourg won the song contest for the third time with Vicky Leandros.

Greek-born singer Vicky Leandros took part in the contest for the second time and won for Luxembourg rumoured to be thanks to a well-planned PR campaign.

This time she also used her surname, something she had avoided the first time when she participated just as "Vicky" in 1967. The winning song Après Toi sold millions of copies, and Vicky Leandros appeared in TV-shows all over Europe. She would try to enter the Eurovision Song Contest again in 2006, but only came 3rd in the German national final for the contest.

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1973

Host City

Luxembourg

Israel joins the family and Luxembourg hosts the Eurovision Song Contest for the 3rd time in history.

For the third time in the 18-year-old history of the Eurovision Song Contest, Luxembourg had the honour of hosting the event with 17 nations being present.

After ending up last two years in a row, Malta decided to withdraw from the contest. Austria decided not to participate either. Instead, a new country joined the song contest, Israel. It was the first non-European country to enter. Israel was allowed to do so because the country was already a member of the European Broadcasting Union. With the Israelis participating, the security control was unusually tight and there were special security measures for their delegation.

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scoreboard

1973 results

Luxembourg

Stories worth telling

Rumours and fame

The event was marked by a scandal: the Spanish entry Eres Tu by Mocedades was accused of plagiarism.

It was suggested by critics that the song was merely a copy of the Yugoslav entry of 1966. The Spanish entry was not sanctioned though and became a huge hit internationally - it even outsold the winner Tu Te Reconnaitras by Anne-Marie David which marked the fourth victory for the Grand Duchy and the second one in a row after Vicky Leandros won the preceding year. Anne-Marie David tried her luck again in 1979 when she competed for France and came third. She is one of the few artists who ended up in the top-3 with all appearances.

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1974

Host City

Brighton

Twice in three years, the UK hosted the Eurovision Song Contest without having won the previous edition.

Due to the fact that the Luxembourg broadcaster RTL did not wish to host the song contest again, this year, the contest was held at The Dome, in the seaside resort of Brighton.

The voting system changed once more: 10 jury members in every country each awarded one point to their favourite song. For the first time, a draw of lots was used to decide the order in which countries would give the results. However, from 1975 onwards, a new voting system would be implemented which basically is still in use today.

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scoreboard

1974 results

Sweden

Stories worth telling

About the Winner

Sweden won the song contest for the first time with the entry Waterloo, performed by the now-pop-legends ABBA.

The song became a huge international hit and was the starting point of the outstanding career of the Swedish four. Over 30 years after it won, Waterloo was even voted the best Eurovision Song Contest song ever at the 50-year anniversary show Congratulations, in Copenhagen in the autumn of 2005.

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1975

Host City

Stockholm

Sweden and its capital Stockholm were the stage for the 1975 Eurovision Song Contest.

Yet again, another voting system was implemented which is still in use today. Juries in every country would give 1 - 12 points to their 10 favourite songs, starting with 12 points to their top favourite, then 10 to the second favourite, 8 to their third favourite, 7 to their fourth favourite and ending with 1 point for their tenth favourite. The votes were cast in the order the songs were performed.

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scoreboard

1975 results

The Netherlands

Stories worth telling

Ding-A-Dong

The first entry of the night was performed by the Netherlands.

The Dutch performers gave a magnificent performance and ended up with the trophy singing Ding-A-Dong. It was the fourth time that the Netherlands won the event.

1975 saw a disappointing result for the German entry Ein Lied Kann Eine Brücke Sein, which was performed by Joy Fleming. The song ended up 17th with just 15 points altogether, but is nowadays seen as a highlight in Eurovision Song Contest history.

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1976

Host City

The Hague

After hosting the 1975 Eurovision Song Contest, Sweden withdrew because Swedish TV thought the contest had become too commercial.

They were also afraid of winning again and having to host the expensive show again. Turkey and Malta withdrew as well, but Greece and Austria returned, so 18 countries participated in the 1976 song contest.

Most of the countries decided to sing in English hoping that they might get a better placing. The Yugoslav entry was sung by Ambassadori and it marked the last Yugoslav entry for 5 years - the country would only come back in 1981.

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scoreboard

1976 results

United Kingdom

Stories worth telling

Saving kisses

The United Kingdom succeeded in winning after performing first on stage - just as the Netherlands had done in the preceding year.

The British winner Save Your Kisses For Me became a record-breaking hit - the single sold six million copies which makes it one of the best-selling Eurovision Song Contest winners ever.

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1977

Host City

London

This year's Eurovision Song Contest took place at the Wembley Conference Centre in London.

The event was postponed for five weeks because of a technicians strike. The song contest was supposed to take place on the 2nd of April, but wasn’t staged until the 7th of May.

The rule of performing in one's national language was brought back to the song contest However, Germany and Belgium were allowed to perform in English due to a misunderstanding in the language rules, thinking it was just a recommendation and not actually compulsory.

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scoreboard

1977 results

France

Stories worth telling

Vive la France!

France won its fifth victory - and last to date - with the song L'Oiseau Et L'Enfant performed by Marie Myriam.

France's victory was a record in Eurovision Song Contest history. The record was equalled by Luxembourg in 1983, and beaten by Ireland in 1994. The United Kingdom entry Rock Bottom by Lynsey de Paul and Mike Moran came second making it the 11th consecutive time that a British entry came top 4.

18 countries took part this year. Sweden returned, and Yugoslavia withdrew from the contest. Tunisia was supposed to take part as well, but the country withdrew its entry

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1978

Host City

Paris

Ah Paris! For the third time in Eurovision Song Contest history, the event was held in France.

After hosting previous contests in Cannes, French Television decided to host it in Paris. A record 20 countries participated this year when Denmark returned to the contest after 11 years of absence. Turkey also participated.

Big European stars participated this year, despite all achieving moderate success. Italy's Ricchi & Poveri, ending up 12th, went on to have a major success in Europe as part of the later wave of Italo-Pop. The popular singer for Germany, Ireen Sheer, took part for the second time and came 6th beating Spain's disco queens Baccara who sang Luxembourg into 7th position.

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scoreboard

1978 results

Israel

1979

Host City

Jerusalem

Outside of Europe, the Israeli capital, Jerusalem, was this year's host city that welcomed 19 different delegations.

Turkey withdrew from the contest because it took place in Israel and many Arab countries put pressure on Turkey not to go to Jerusalem.

Lots of the artists were familiar - they had returned to the contest like Peter, Sue & Marc from Switzerland, Anne-Marie David, the 1973 winner for Luxembourg, now singing for France, and Anita Skorgan for Norway.

The German entry, performed by band Dschinghis Khan went on to become a hit in several European countries, despite being heavily criticised in Germany itself.

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scoreboard

1979 results

Israel

Stories worth telling

Israel again

A very peculiar situation happened in the 1979 Eurovision Song Contest in Jerusalem.

When the last country still had to announce their points, Spain was in the lead with 116 points beating Israel by just one point. The last country voting was Spain itself; they awarded Israel 10 points, giving them a home victory with great celebrations in the audience.

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Next Decade

1980s

Eurovision

Credits

Project & Content Manager

Marieke Duijts

Editorial contributions

Victor Escudero
Olena Omelyanchuk
Gordon Roxburgh
Jarmo Siim

Concept

Scrn

Technical supervision

Wouter van Vliet

Digital Production

Elespacio - Lucas Onofre

Art Direction & Design

Elespacio - Brijan Powell
Elespacio - Samuel Hoh
Elespacio - Pavel Proshin

Development

Elespacio - Jacek Zakowicz
Elespacio - Cristina Franco
Elespacio - Jonathan Icicson

Photo & video credits

Getty Images
Beeld & Geluid (Dutch Institute for Sound and Vision)
BBC Photo Library
ORF/Thomas Ramstorfer
EBU
Stijn Smulders
Jan Demulder
Wim Dehandschutter
Femke de Laat
Andres Putting
Thomas Hanses
Dennis Stachel
Sander Hesterman
Elke Roels
Marieke Duijts
Indrek Galetin
Alain Douit
Kenneth Thorén (SVT)
SurFeRGiRL30
James Morley
Anthony Kelly
Sam Shaw
Peter Mackey
Philippe Schlesser
Polfoto - Jacob Maarbjerg
Jacinta lluch Valero
Gage Skidmore
Gustavo Devito
Robert Scoble
R Barraez D´Lucca
Asim Bijarani
Chris - RMS Olympic Broadside View Post-Titanic
Kamil Porembiński - RBMK-1000, Chernobyl
Dan Queiroz
François Péladeau / Vancityhotshots
NASA image acquired April 16, 2010
Julian Burgess
Alex Hill
Bryan Dorrough
South African Tourism
Maxwell Hamilton
Paisley Scotland
Alf Melin
Ross Fowler
Cliff
Yukiko Matsuoka
Irish Typepad
hobvias sudoneighm

Special thanks to

Samuel Andersson (SVT)
Stephanie Caflisch (EBU)
Jeroen Depraetere
Maartje Jansma (Beeld & Geluid)
Gijs Kimenai (Beeld & Geluid)
Maiken Maimets (OGAE)
Helen Ridell (BBC)
Sarah Sadek (EBU)
Jon Ola Sand (EBU)
Dave Goodman (EBU)
David A Allan

A special thanks to all Heads of Delegations, members of the Reference Group, EBU Member Broadcaster representatives and fans who have contributed to this project.

Project Supervisor

Sietse Bakker


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With thanks

Eurovision Song Contest, Scrn, Elespacio